Bristol History – Celebrating the lives of ordinary people

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Hello I’m DP Lindegaard and I’ve been researching social history in the West for nearly 50 years

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Warts and all - my family history: Honours; Pillingers; Frays & Lindegaards

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‘WANTON WENCHES’ AND ‘INCORRIGIBLE ROGUES’ CHAPTER 3: The Bristol First Fleeters

The majority were young men all convicted by the Bristol courts for (usually) petty thefts committed in the city. Most had waited years in Newgate gaol, and suffered further imprisonment and hard labour in the hulks before leaving for their eventual destination. A few were Bristolians ‘born and bred’ though others came from farther afield. One, John Barry, was black. It is quite likely the older men, those born about 1760 or before left wives behind. With the logistics of the enterprise...

Fireside chatter: Are there still coal men?

We had a coal fire at home at 33 Victoria Park, Kingswood. (I was born in 1937, so I’m thinking of about 1945 onwards.) Dad had already left for work at the Gas Company...

A historical misprint from a Bristol newspaper

Jacob Shartman senior & junior & William Shartman: “This is to certify to all persons that are afflicted by worms in many parts of their bodies or any other distemper that I, William Shartman,...

More of the Peters family story

The history of Jimmy Peters, the first black man to play Rugby Union for England, and the sketchy life of his father George is told in a previous blog. In this post, I return...

James Peters, 1879-1954, England Rugby Union International and Gentleman

‘Peters, it may be mentioned is, as a Rugby player, English whatever his nationality proper may be.’   Western Mail, 8.9.1906. N.B. This account contains terms that are no longer acceptable, though were in common...

Cap badge of the Gloucestershire Regiment

‘Uncle Norman’: Perrett Park Keeper and veteran of ‘the Forgotten War’

We had it pretty sticky for a few days – our casualties up to Wednesday were approximately a thousand, The Gloucesters were over 600 and the other two battalions about 150 each.”    ...

A Brislington Autograph Book, 1916

Through the magic of the internet assisted by the mention of Brislington on this blog, I was recently contacted by Carol Gordon of Bolton, Lancashire. A while ago Carol bought a tiny autograph book,...

Newgate Gaol, Bristol: ‘White above and foul below’, John Howard, prison reformer

‘Wanton Wenches & Incorrigible Rogues’ Chapter 2: The inmates of Bristol’s Newgate Prison, 1783-1787

In 1761, John Wesley who was interested in prison reform noted that Bristol’s Newgate Gaol was lately wearing ‘a new face’ and had changed for the better from ‘the filth, the stench, the misery...

‘Wanton Wenches’ and ‘Incorrigible Rogues’ Chapter 1: Two Mutinies: a Horrid set of Miscreants

Peace with the infant republic of America was declared in August 1783. With the small detail that Britain had lost the war apparently discounted, it appears that the arrogant assumption was made that everything...

Brislington Coal

There are references to coalmining in Brislington from the early 17th century: the first being in 1614 when Anthony son of William Roache, collier, of Brislington was apprenticed to Chris. Powell, a Bristol weaver....